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Seattle to Build Nation’s First Food Forest

 

 

Seattle is planning to build a new city park filled with hundreds of edible plants – such as fruit trees, vegetables plants, herbs, etc… Free to “anyone and everyone.” If successful, it will be the first “food forest” of the nation.

 

An inspiration and a model for everyone!

 

Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.

 

Read more at Take Part

 

Ocean Cleanup Array to remove 7,250,000 tons of plastic waste from the oceans

 

 

19-year-old Boyan Slat has unveiled plans to create an Ocean Cleanup Array that could remove 7,250,000 tons of plastic waste from the world’s oceans.

 

 

The device consists of an anchored network of floating booms and processing platforms that could be dispatched to garbage patches around the world. Instead of moving through the ocean, the array would span the radius of a garbage patch, acting as a giant funnel. The angle of the booms would force plastic in the direction of the platforms, where it would be separated from plankton, filtered and stored for recycling.

 

Slat went on to found The Ocean Cleanup Foundation, a non-profit organization which is responsible for the development of his proposed technologies. His ingenious solution could potentially save hundreds of thousands of aquatic animals annually, and reduce pollutants (including PCB and DDT) from building up in the food chain. It could also save millions per year, both in clean-up costs, lost tourism and damage to marine vessels.

 

Please help support the campaign for a Feasibility Study on Ocean Cleanup

 

Source Inhabitat – Ocean Cleanup Array

 

 

 

Graphene Supercapacitor – The Future of Energy Storage

 

 

Graphene – a simple carbon polymer, which can be used as the basic component of a supercapacitor – a high energy density storage device that charges far more rapidly than chemical batteries.

 

The future of energy storage – the battery tech of today!

 

 

The Super Supercapacitor

 

Read more about this scientific discovery at ReWire Science

 

 

What is Graphene?

 
Video compliments of Vega Science Trust
 

She's Alive, She's Home, She's Dying!

 

 

This is a non-commercial attempt to highlight the fact that world leaders, irresponsible corporations and mindless ‘consumers’ are combining to destroy life on earth. It is dedicated to all who died fighting for the planet and those whose lives are on the line today.

 

The film cut was put together by Vivek Chauhan, a young film maker, together with naturalists working with the Sanctuary Asia network.

 

Seeds of Freedom

 

 

The story of seed has become one of loss, control, dependence and debt.
It’s been written by those who want to make vast profit from our food system, no matter what the true cost.
It’s time to change the story.

Seeds of Freedom from The ABN and The Gaia Foundation on Vimeo.

A landmark film narrated by Jeremy Irons. Find out more at seedsoffreedom.info

Produced by The Gaia Foundation and The African Biodiversity Network, in collaboration with MELCA Ethiopia, Navdanya International and GRAIN.

Wake Up, Freak Out – then Get a Grip

 

A short animated film about the feedback loops likely to lead to catastrophic climate change, by Leo Murray.

 

Road of the Future

Interactive and Electric Car Ready Highways are Here | Netherlands

 

 

A futuristic highway that can save energy and improve road safety is set to be installed in the Netherlands by mid-2013.

 

 

Two companies, Studio Roosegaarde and Heijmans Infrastructure, came up with the highway, which includes: glow-in-the-dark road markings painted with photo-luminescent paint which are charged during the day and light up during the night; temperature-responsive paint which indicates slippery roads when temperatures fall below zero; and interactive lights along the highway that light up as cars approach. Wind lights that light up using the draft produced by cars and priority induction lanes that can recharge electric cars as they run along them also feature.

The luminous road markings and weather indicating roads will debut in the Dutch province of Brabant in the middle of next year. The wind powered and interactive lights along with the induction lanes are planned to go into service in upcoming years.

 

Worldwide Crop Yields Are Decreasing

 

The global demand for agricultural crops is expected to roughly double by 2050, driven by increases in population, meat and dairy consumption and biofuel use. However, between 1985 and 2005, the total global crop production increased by only 28%.

Clearly, these recent gains in global crop production fall short of the expected demands, leaving us with an important question: Which crops and which geographic regions offer the best hope of meeting projected demands, and where are improvements most needed?

 

Adding to this concern, some authors have suggested that yields for many important crops may be stagnating in some regions around the world. In particular, there are concerns that yields may be stagnating or declining for three key crops – maize, rice and wheat – which together produce ~ 57% of the world’s agricultural calories.

A slowing, or worse, stagnation or collapse in the yield gains in these crops would have profound implications for the world food system.

Continue reading the story at Nature Communications

 

DOE is developing batteries 5x more powerful & cheaper in 5 years

5x5x5 DOE Battery Project

The U.S. Dept. of Energy has set a goal to develop battery and energy storage technologies that are five times more powerful and five times cheaper than today’s within five years.

 

The DOE is creating a new Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, at a cost of $120 million over five years, that’s intended to reproduce development environments that were successfully used by Bell Laboratories in the World War II Manhattan Project that produced an atomic bomb.


The Battery and Energy Storage Hub project will involve six national labs, five universities — Northwestern University, University of Chicago, University of Illinois-Chicago, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, and University of Michigan — and four private firms, Dow Chemical, Applied Materials, Johnson Controls, and Clean Energy Trust.

 

“When you had to deliver the goods very, very quickly, you needed to put the best scientists next to the best engineers across disciplines to get very focused,” said U.S. Energy Secretary Stephen Chu.

Continue reading the story at Computerworld’s Emerging Technologies